m3zzaluna:

the black swan (detail), miami, florida, 1990 [original]
© luis castañeda [website], from leica: witness to a century

blame-my-muses:

leslieseuffert:

Numen/ For Use For Use used thick transparent sticky tape to create an interactive installation. By stretching, sticking and wrapping thick layers of tape around grounded pillars, beams, trees or whatever standing objects exist in the chosen space Numen/ For Use create a web of tendon tunnels and spaces that can be accessed and crawled through, strong enough to carry human weight. From afar the installation appears like an interwoven structure of bending elastic pipes.

i thought this was spiderweb and i was HORRIFIED

"

Often, in an immigrant family, it’s a very big departure for a child to say: I want to be an artist, not a doctor, not a lawyer, or an engineer. The father, here, tells his daughter what so many immigrant parents tell their children: Art is not the safest route in life. We didn’t sacrifice all this for you to take up a precarious profession.

He tries to comfort her, at the same time, by insisting that being an immigrant makes her an artist already. And this is a fascinating notion: that re-creating yourself this way, re-creating your entire life is a form of reinvention on par with the greatest works of literature. This brings art into the realm of what ordinary people do to in order to survive. It takes away the notion that art is too lofty for the masses, and puts it in the day-to-day. I’ve never seen anyone connect being an artist and an immigrant so explicitly, and for me it was a revelation.

"
Edwidge Danticat, All Immigrants are Artists.  (via mimasux)

(Source: beyondvictoriana)

(Source: jim-carreys)

the-mighty-sloth:

odelia-jay:

»» The MLK that’s never quoted.

and it’s no accident that this segment is conveniently left out of our education

(Source: beybad)

lati-negros:

writeswrongs:

cavetocanvas:

Gordon ParksDr. Kenneth B. Clark conducting the Doll Test, Harlem, New York, 1947

In the “doll test,” psychologists Kenneth and Mamie Clark used four plastic, diaper-clad dolls, identical except for color. They showed the dolls to black children between the ages of three and seven and asked them questions to determine racial perception and preference. Almost all of the children readily identified the race of the dolls. However, when asked which they preferred, the majority selected the white doll and attributed positive characteristics to it. The Clarks also gave the children outline drawings of a boy and girl and asked them to color the figures the same color as themselves. Many of the children with dark complexions colored the figures with a white or yellow crayon. The Clarks concluded that “prejudice, discrimination, and segregation” caused black children to develop a sense of inferiority and self-hatred. This photograph was taken by Gordon Parks for a 1947 issue of Ebony magazine. (via)

You want to know what is exceptionally fucked up?

The same study was replicated in 2008.  Dark-skinned children still by far selected the white doll.  Repeatedly. 

Dr. Kenneth B. Clark - Panamanian

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